Time management tips

Pick less important tasks, those that would only take you away from more important activities next week. Work on them for 2 to 4 hours on Saturday and Sunday. This is enough for you to do some meaningful work, but also leave enough space for non-work, typical weekend activities.

Productivity dashboard screenshot

Know How You Spend Your Time

Identifying your most time-consuming tasks and determining whether you are investing your time in the most important activities can help you to determine a course of action. Having a good sense of the time required for routine tasks can help you be more realistic in planning and estimating how much time is available for other activities. Many apps exist to help you keep track of your time, as mentioned in Strategy 3.

Managing your time effectively requires a distinction between what is important and what is urgent (MacKenzie, 1990). Experts agree that the most important tasks usually aren’t the most urgent tasks. However, we tend to let the urgent tasks dominate our lives. Covey, Merrill, and Merrill (1994) categorize activities into four quadrants in their Time Management Matrix: urgent, not urgent, important, and not important. While activities that are both urgent and important must be done, Covey et al. suggests spending less time on activities that are not important (regardless of their urgency) to gain time for activities that are not urgent but important. Focusing on these important activities allows you to gain greater control over your time and may reduce the number of important tasks that become urgent.

Creating a "to do” list is an easy way to prioritize. Whether you need a daily, weekly, or monthly list depends on your lifestyle. Be careful to keep list-making from getting out of control. List manageable tasks rather than goals or multi-step plans. Rank the items on your “to do” list in order of priority (both important and urgent). You may choose to group items in categories such as high priority, medium priority, or low priority; number them in order of priority; or use a color-coding system. The goal is not to mark off the most items, but to mark off the highest priority items (MacKenzie, 1990). A prioritized “to do” list allows you to set boundaries so you can say “no” to activities that may be interesting or provide a sense of achievement but do not fit your basic priorities.

Create to-do lists

Not all tasks are equally important or urgent. You’ll want to avoid working on trivial tasks during your productive peak time, or spending too much on them. Everyday, you’re bound to have at least 1 or 2 crucial tasks, and you should prioritize your to-do lists accordingly.

To determine priority of tasks, turn to your to-do list. Think about whether that phone call you have to make to a client is more, or less important, than the report you have to send to your project manager. Do you really need to answer all those emails? Could you delegate that project research to a colleague?

Eat the frog first, ie. your most important thing. Don’t start the "B" item or any other item, before finishing the "A" item. Delegating or eliminating trivial tasks will free up your schedule so you’ll be able to focus on most important tasks and devote them more time.

How to manage your time better

1. Evaluate current time usage

Before you practice better time management, you’ll need to evaluate how you currently manage your time. For example, you may think it only takes you 45 minutes to draft and send emails each day but it may actually take you 90 minutes.

One of the easiest ways to track time is with an app that tracks everything you do for seven days. You may also set a timer for your tasks, write down the times and add up the time on a sheet of paper at the end of your week. Once you begin tracking your time, you will gain a more accurate sense of what tasks take up the majority of your time and then make appropriate adjustments.

2. Identify your goals

Identifying your work goals, both large and small, can give you a clear understanding of where you should focus your time each day. For example, if your goal is to complete a project by the end of the week, write the overall goal and the smaller goals that will lead to the completion of the project on time.

3. List tasks

Creating to-do lists helps you map out exactly what needs to be done and by when. This will help you to see what you should prioritize each week and what can wait. Check your list and make sure you’ve organized it based on a task’s importance rather than its urgency. Important responsibilities are those that help you achieve your goals while urgent tasks are typically associated with helping achieve someone else’s goals.

4. Use time management tools

Try using a planner, calendar or time management software to plan your day. You’ll find that the time you spend creating a clear task path is less than the amount you might spend randomly jumping from task to task when you lack a detailed plan. There may be other tasks that come up that aren’t on your to-do list, but try to reschedule the tasks you can’t complete as planned instead of abandoning them.

5. Set time limits

Try setting yourself a time limit for each task during the day. For instance, if you have to write a budget report for your job, you may decide that you can complete it in three hours and then move on to something else. This challenges you to reduce procrastination so you can adhere to your allotted time schedule for each task. Try to realistically evaluate how much work goes into each task to help you maintain a certain level of accuracy and keep your stress under control.

6. Compile related tasks

7. Plan your day

You might end your day by spending 15 minutes after work organizing your office and listing the most important things you may need to do the next day. Or, you may choose to plan your day early in the morning before you begin working. Try writing down the most important items and then complete them at the time of day when you are most productive.

8. Take care of difficult tasks first

While it may be easy to leave difficult tasks for last, it may be more beneficial if you complete the most difficult tasks first. When you choose to complete these tasks first, you generally have a clear mind and more energy because you haven’t been inundated by other tasks that might drain your energy.

9. Make meetings productiv e

Meetings are often necessary but they can cut into your work time. If you are leading a meeting, have a plan to cover the necessary information without wasting your time or that of your coworkers. Have an outline for what you want to cover during the meeting and the desired outcome. Keep the meeting as brief and productive as possible and end with action items.

10. Get organized

Try to declutter your workspace and place things back where they belong when you are finished using them. If you often open documents and files on a computer, try setting up a system that allows you to find necessary documents quicker. You may also try organizing your email by unsubscribing from unnecessary content so you can get to important emails more quickly.

11. Include a buffer in your schedule

Create a block of buffer time in between each completed task. This allows you to have extra time to finish tasks without taking time from another responsibility. Having this time cushion may also allow you to decompress and take a break, walk, get a snack or do some other short unrelated work duty. When you allow buffer time, you won’t feel as though you must rush through tasks.

12. Give yourself breaks

Dedicating time in your day to brief disconnections from your work will allow you to decompress and come back to your active tasks with a new perspective. Learning when to take dedicated breaks throughout your day will also help you develop effective stress management habits.

13. Let go of perfectionism

You like want your work to be efficient and accurate, but try letting go of perfectionism. You probably won’t have enough time to complete several tasks in a day if you spend your time doing and then re-doing a task several times to make sure it’s perfect. Instead, do the best you can with what you have and move on.

Authorship:

https://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=C1042
https://clockify.me/time-management-tips
https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/manage-your-time-better
Time management tips

Unsubscribing manually can take some time, so it’s best that you let an app do it for you. Unroll.me is a nice option that shows you a concise list of your email subscriptions, and lets you unsubscribe to irrelevant emails in a click.

Summary report to assess productivity

Know How You Spend Your Time

Identifying your most time-consuming tasks and determining whether you are investing your time in the most important activities can help you to determine a course of action. Having a good sense of the time required for routine tasks can help you be more realistic in planning and estimating how much time is available for other activities. Many apps exist to help you keep track of your time, as mentioned in Strategy 3.

Managing your time effectively requires a distinction between what is important and what is urgent (MacKenzie, 1990). Experts agree that the most important tasks usually aren’t the most urgent tasks. However, we tend to let the urgent tasks dominate our lives. Covey, Merrill, and Merrill (1994) categorize activities into four quadrants in their Time Management Matrix: urgent, not urgent, important, and not important. While activities that are both urgent and important must be done, Covey et al. suggests spending less time on activities that are not important (regardless of their urgency) to gain time for activities that are not urgent but important. Focusing on these important activities allows you to gain greater control over your time and may reduce the number of important tasks that become urgent.

Creating a "to do” list is an easy way to prioritize. Whether you need a daily, weekly, or monthly list depends on your lifestyle. Be careful to keep list-making from getting out of control. List manageable tasks rather than goals or multi-step plans. Rank the items on your “to do” list in order of priority (both important and urgent). You may choose to group items in categories such as high priority, medium priority, or low priority; number them in order of priority; or use a color-coding system. The goal is not to mark off the most items, but to mark off the highest priority items (MacKenzie, 1990). A prioritized “to do” list allows you to set boundaries so you can say “no” to activities that may be interesting or provide a sense of achievement but do not fit your basic priorities.

Use a Planning Tool

Time management experts recommend using a personal planning tool to improve your productivity. Personal planning tools include planners, calendars, phone apps, wall charts, index cards, pocket diaries, and notebooks. Writing down your tasks, schedules, and items to remember can free your mind to focus on your priorities. Auditory learners may prefer to dictate their thoughts instead. The key is to find one planning tool that works for you and use that tool consistently.

Set up three boxes (or corners of a room) labeled "Keep," "Give Away," and "Toss." Sort items into these boxes. Discard items in your “Toss” box. Your "Give Away" box may include items you want to sell, donate, or discard.

The next step is to improve the time you spend processing information. For example, tasks such as email can eat up your day. To combat wasted time, implement an email organization system that allows you to process the information in each email as efficiently as possible. Use folders, flagging, or a color-coded system to keep track of what’s what.

Create to-do lists

Not all tasks are equally important or urgent. You’ll want to avoid working on trivial tasks during your productive peak time, or spending too much on them. Everyday, you’re bound to have at least 1 or 2 crucial tasks, and you should prioritize your to-do lists accordingly.

To determine priority of tasks, turn to your to-do list. Think about whether that phone call you have to make to a client is more, or less important, than the report you have to send to your project manager. Do you really need to answer all those emails? Could you delegate that project research to a colleague?

Eat the frog first, ie. your most important thing. Don’t start the "B" item or any other item, before finishing the "A" item. Delegating or eliminating trivial tasks will free up your schedule so you’ll be able to focus on most important tasks and devote them more time.

Set deadlines for yourself

Plan your schedule for the next day, and set a deadline for each task. You can set a rough estimate, but it’s best if you make the deadline more lenient than strict. This way, you’re likely to finish earlier than estimated, which will be encouraging for your moral.

Knowing how much time you spend on each task or type of project answers how productive you really are. It also helps you make more accurate time estimates for future work, so you’ll save time in the long run.

First, go to the Time Tracker page, write the activity you’re working on in the "What’s up" box and start the timer. Once you’re done, turn off the timer, and repeat until you’ve finished with activities for that work day.

Time tracker screenshot

Productivity dashboard screenshot

Or, go to Reports, to see a more detailed breakdown of your day: how much time you’ve spent on each activity, project, client (Summary Report), the activity’s details (Detailed Report), and whether you have fulfilled your daily quota (Weekly Report).

10 Ways To Improve Your Time-Management Skills

A mastery of time-management skills enables a professional to accomplish their daily responsibilities quickly and effectively. If you’re a professional who finds time management challenging, it can be helpful to know different techniques you can use to develop time-management skills. In this article, we discuss 10 ways to manage your time more effectively.

Time-management skills are a broad set of skills that help you manage the time you spend during the workday and ensure that it’s being spent as effectively as possible. A few essential time-management skills include:

Prioritization

This is the act of assigning a level of importance to different tasks and ensuring that tasks of higher importance are accomplished before tasks of lower importance. Effectively prioritizing your tasks requires that you have a strong understanding of how long each job you have will take you to complete. Becoming skilled at prioritizing your responsibilities will also allow you to complete your essential tasks more efficiently.

Planning

Being able to analyze a task or a set of tasks and develop a schedule for their completion is essential. Effective time management requires you to have strong planning skills to ensure you can develop and apply an organized understanding of your responsibilities when constructing your task schedules.

Stress management

The ability to recognize your personal stress levels and make accommodations within your work can keep your level of stress low. Rewarding yourself, delegating your tasks and taking breaks when needed allows you to stay focused and motivated as you accomplish each of the daily tasks on your schedule. Understanding your stress levels will also help you effectively use breaks during your day and know when to turn down tasks that will overwhelm you.

Goal-setting

Setting defined goals for yourself throughout your work, such as accomplishing a specific task or a segment of a job, is an essential part of time management. Setting a series of realistic goals and a series of optimal goals allows you to feel each accomplishment throughout your day as a source of motivation and encouragement. Goal-setting can work in tandem with stress management to help you increase your efficiency on an hourly and daily basis.

Communication

This skill represents your ability to express your goals, plans and needs in verbal and written forms. Well-developed communication skills allow you to develop efficient schedules and plans. It also helps you in accomplishing your tasks more effectively through delegation and teamwork.

How to improve time-management skills

1. Start your tasks early

If you have the opportunity, starting a task before you’re scheduled to begin working on it can help you overcome the initial preparatory stages of an assignment. This enables you to start developing your strategy preemptively, which can also help overcome procrastination.

2. Set limits for what you’ll say yes to

Many people will accept as many responsibilities as others ask of them to make a positive impression and demonstrate their dedication to their work. However, taking on too many responsibilities can make developing a schedule that accommodates all of your tasks very challenging. Setting limits for how many active jobs you’re willing to accept from others can help you avoid having an overwhelming number of responsibilities.

3. Give yourself breaks

Dedicating time in your day to brief disconnections from your work will allow you to decompress and come back to your active tasks with a new perspective. Learning when to take dedicated breaks throughout your day will also help you develop effective stress management habits.

4. Prioritize your tasks

Determine how important each of your tasks is to each other. Assigning a priority to specific tasks can help you focus your efforts on the things that need your time the most. Practicing prioritizing your tasks allows you to understand how to better construct your schedules and identify which tasks are worth delegating.

5. Schedule your tasks and their deadlines

Take time to compose a detailed schedule for each of your active tasks and set firm deadlines for them. Doing this can help you visualize which tasks need more effort and can help you better understand the pace at which you’re capable of completing your work. Make a habit of keeping your schedule up to date, as a comprehensive schedule can serve as the foundation for helping you grow your planning and prioritization skills.

6. Organize your workspace

An organized workspace can help you save time within your day by preventing you from having to search for the materials you need to complete each task. Additionally, developing organizational skills will help you strengthen your planning capabilities. Not having to worry about finding particular documents or task materials will help alleviate daily stress.

7. Learn your patterns of productivity

Everybody has different patterns of how productive they are throughout their day. Some people are much more efficient in the earlier hours of the day, whereas others may not hit their productivity peak until after lunch. Identifying what times of day are the most productive for you can help you use each part of the day more effectively. By scheduling faster or easier tasks during your less productive times, you ensure that your peak productivity is being devoted to longer, higher-priority tasks.

8. Use technology to help keep you accountable

Time tracking and daily management software are becoming more commonly integrated into the workplace every year. Time-tracking software lets you time how long it takes you to complete individual tasks, and daily management software integrates your time-tracking results into your schedule. Together, these tools will allow you to create more realistic and accurate schedules and can help you catch yourself before becoming distracted or procrastinating for too long.

9. Focus on one task at a time

Multitasking may seem like an effective strategy to accomplish multiple tasks more quickly. However, those who focus on completing two assignments one at a time typically complete each task faster and with greater quality than those who multitask. Spending your time focusing on completing one task at a time will also help you reduce the potential for distractions.

10. Reinforce your good habits

When you finish tasks or you notice that you’ve made a difference in your productivity by developing your time-management skills using some of these techniques, you may want to reinforce your success with a small reward. Finding an enjoyable reward for yourself that doesn’t detract from your daily productivity may reduce stress and motivate you to continue developing your time-management skills.

Authorship:

https://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=C1042
https://clockify.me/time-management-tips
https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/improve-time-management-skills
Time management tips

Are you a morning person, a night owl, or do you fall somewhere in between these molds? Oftentimes, these types of questions can help your time management strategies as you determine when you’re most productive during the day.

25 time management tips for work

When it comes to being your most productive and efficient self at work, proper time management is a must. Time management is a skill that nearly every employee should have. But it can be challenging to develop. So what is time management? And why is it so important for employees? Let’s find out.

Time management is the practice of allocating your time to tasks productively and efficiently. Often, time management involves planning out your daily activities and exercising conscious control of your time as you complete those activities. Some common themes for effective time management include clear goals, priorities, and expectations.

You can apply the practice of time management to any part of your life, including professional and personal time. But in professional spheres, perfecting time management is one of the most vital skills employees should develop.

Practicing time management in the workplace is important because it can help you meet deadlines and be productive at work. Time management can also improve your mental health. You’ll feel less stressed, knowing how to allocate your time for each task. Experiencing less stress at work can help you achieve a better work-life balance.

Having poor time management skills can result in late assignments, poor work quality, and higher stress. You may feel less balanced in your work and experience burnout as a result. Burnout can stifle your creativity and leave you frustrated and angry with your assignments or employer.

By implementing practical time management skills, you can do more than impress your boss and co-workers. You can become an integral member of your team, proving you’re a dependable, productive, and efficient employee. With that in mind, let’s dive into 25 of the best time management tips for work.

Start every day with a list of the tasks you hope to accomplish. Once you get into work, write down your to-do list and prioritize those tasks appropriately. As you finish those tasks, check them off the list. Enjoy the sense of accomplishment you get with each check, and keep the momentum going!

Writing out a list of tasks is one thing. But you also have to know how to prioritize those tasks. Prioritize the most immediate tasks first. These tasks might be those that are due sooner or take more time to complete. If a task feels too big, break it into smaller tasks to make it feel more realistic. After that, you can organize your tasks based on importance, due date, or requester.

Once you’ve created your list, dive into your most important task. The sooner you can start working on it, the faster you can check it off. If you have a big task that might take all day, break it down into smaller tasks. Completing those smaller tasks can help you feel more accomplished as the day goes on.

Tracking time is the best way to master time management. Estimate how long it will take you to complete a task. Then monitor the time you spend on that task and compare it to your estimated time. Monitoring your time can help you be more conscious of the flow during the workday. And with the right time management solution, you can track time for each task and keep a history of all the time you spent on a project . You might even find a tool that helps you create and view reports of your time based on project, task, or team.

Distractions are the enemy of anyone trying to manage their time. Find ways to block out distractions as much as possible. Turn on “do not disturb” on your phone or work computer. Listen to your favorite music to block out noisy office chatter. And if you have to, go offline to avoid things like social media, the news, or emails.

Multiple studies have shown that multitasking overloads the brain. Instead of getting more done at once, multitasking can have the opposite effect. Multitaskers are more prone to errors, take more time to complete projects, and focus less. The brain can only focus on one or two things at a time. Switching between tasks only disorients the brain, so avoid it if you can.

Besides tracking your time with a time tracking solution, other time management apps and tools may help you monitor or organize your to-do list. Apps like Freedom can help you block sites that might distract you. Meanwhile, project management tools like Asana, Airtable, and Trello can help you organize, prioritize, and visualize your tasks. You can even sync these apps with your time tracking solution to improve task visibility and track time on projects.

If you want to improve your time management skills, the best way to do it is by auditing your time. Every week, record how much time you hope to spend on a project. As you complete assignments, track your time until you complete them. By the end of the week, you’ll have a record wherein you can compare actual time spent and estimated time spent. Use this to make adjustments to your time management plans. Continue to review your results week over week to see trends and gradual improvements.

Use Time Management Tools

And speaking of to-do lists, one of the best things you can do to manage your time more wisely is by using as many tools as necessary to support your position. There are millions of computer programs and smartphone apps out there waiting to make your life easier with a simple download. Even adding a single time management tool to your repertoire can save you hours of work each week.

A great example worth a look is Toggl Plan’s project management software, which allows you to create everything from checklists to timelines. The daily, weekly, and annual overview features make it easy to plan ahead and shoot for success on every project. You can even incorporate integrations and extensions of other tools you’re already using to improve your overall experience and boost efficiency.

Part 5: Protect your time (and focus) from distraction

Distraction is the soundtrack to our workdays. And nothing screws up your carefully planned schedule like an unexpected interruption. The modern workplace is a minefield of interruptions, yet to spend the time we need on our core work, we have to be able to block (or at least hold off) distractions.

Use strategic laziness to work on the right things

The concept of “Strategic laziness” doesn’t have anything to do with loafing around, however. Instead, it’s about prioritizing the work and tasks that are important and allowing yourself to be lazy or “not good” at those that don’t matter.

“I’ve received plenty of Bs and even Cs for classes that I was incredibly proud of because they came from hardly any time spent at all. Time that I could then spend on reading my own curriculum, starting my own projects, and running my own businesses.

“And I did. During my undergrad, I created Instiki, Rails, Basecamp, and got on the path to being a partner at 37signals. Do you think I could fit all that and still get straight As?”

Automate non-negotiable focused time throughout the day

Use the Ivy Lee Method to end your day properly

There’s a number of reasons why this technique is so effective. For one, it is super simple and forces you to single task. Second, with only six daily slots, it makes you become deliberate in planning each day. And lastly, with your tasks laid out before you get to work, there’s less barrier or friction to getting started.

Don’t forget the benefits of free time

“One of the sneakier pitfalls of an efficiency-based attitude to time is that we start to feel pressured to use our leisure time ‘productively’, too. An attitude which implies that enjoying leisure for its own sake, which you might have assumed was the whole point of leisure, is somehow not quite enough.”

So, when you are off the clock, try making your home environment less tech-centric, or set aside time to work on a hobby or simply to be alone with your thoughts. While not directly tied to time management, these simple practices can help keep us focused throughout the week.

Use the right time management tools to supercharge these tips

A calendar app for organizing blocks

A daytimer for staying on task

Time management is all about focus. To stay focused, use a simple Pomodoro timer (such as Be Focused). Having your remaining time visible can be a huge motivator and also help you estimate how long future tasks will take you.

A time-tracking tool for identifying distractions and perfecting your schedule

There are too many distractions just waiting to ruin your perfectly planned day. By using a tool like RescueTime, you can quickly see where you’re most distracted, what time of day you’re most productive, and even set goals around time spent on email, social media, or entertainment during the workday.

We can’t control time moving forward, but we can try and find ways to control how we spend our time. With these time management tips and strategies, you should be ready to delegate, prioritize, and schedule your time properly.

Authorship:

https://quickbooks.intuit.com/r/manage-employees/time-management-tips/
https://toggl.com/blog/12-time-management-strategies
https://blog.rescuetime.com/time-management/
Time management tips

Review you work list right now and put an A, B, C, D, or E next to each task or activity. Select your A-1 job or project and begin on it immediately. Discipline yourself to do nothing else until this one job is complete. It will become one of the best time management tools you can use.

Time Management Tips how to manage time effectively

Time Management Tips That Will Make You a Productivity Master

Success in almost everything involves time management. It seems like there aren’t enough hours in the day to get everything that you need to do accomplished, but if you want to achieve much more than others in a shorter amount of time, you must improve how you manage that time.

Time is your most precious resource. It is the most valuable thing you have. It is perishable, it is irreplaceable, and it cannot be saved. It can only be reallocated from activities of lower value to activities of higher value.

It was something that you used to increase productivity and eventually be paid more money. Then I learned that time management is not a peripheral activity or skill. It is the core skill upon which everything else in life depends.

time management tip laid over an ocean scene

Eat That Frog!

Mark Twain once said that if the first thing you do each morning is to eat that frog, you can go through the day with the satisfaction of knowing that that is probably the worse things that is going to happen to you all day long.

If You Have To Eat A Live Frog At All, It Doesn’t Pay To Sit And Look At It For Very Long

“Failure to execute” is one of the biggest problems in organizations today. Many people confuse activity with accomplishment. They talk continually, hold endless meetings, and make wonderful plans, but in the final analysis, no one does the job and gets the results required.

There Are No Shortcuts

Best Time Management Tips to Know

1. Set Realistic Goals That Benefit Each Other

We all have both short-term and long-term goals. What we must do, she says, is to make sure that there is some correlation between these two goals lists. If you have no (or very few) near-term goals which also help achieve your bigger-picture future goals, you’ll probably not accomplish them, meaning they’re a waste of time, practically speaking.

2. Invest in a Proper To-Do List

One of the best ways to get started in figuring out how to manage time effectively is to invest in a proper to-do list. As we’re well into the 21st century, I suggest going for a digital task list, such as a mobile app.

My personal favorite is Todoist, which is free (but has a premium version which is amazing!). On Todoist, you can group tasks into projects, add subtasks, set priorities, share your lists with friends and family, set due dates, include comments, and so much more.

3. Use the Pareto Analysis to Prioritize Tasks

The Pareto Analysis attempts to classify which of your actions are on the 80/20 side, so to speak, and which are on the 20/80 side. Once you understand which activities and tasks are easy but have high impact, you can be more productive and better manage your time.

4. Avoid Being a Perfectionist

“If we insist on being perfect in every task, we minimize the chance that we will actually complete the task. In fact, perfect is the enemy of good. If 80% of the effort produces 95% of the product, does it really make sense to reach for that final 5%? Will anyone notice? Will it affect the outcome?”

According to Psychology Today, “Because they equate their self-worth with flawless performance, perfectionists often get hung up on meaningless details and spend more time on projects than is necessary. Ultimately, productivity suffers.”

5. Track Your Activities

Tracking the time spent on your various activities, as well as the specific activities you do each day, is one of the best ways to manage your time more effectively and efficiently. Activity tracking allows you to evaluate your progress and establish benchmarks, and, in time, you’ll be able to gradually weed out time-wasters.

If you want to go simple and free, use Google Sheets or Microsoft Excel and just create a spreadsheet of your daily activities. However, if you really want to manage your time more effectively, go for a full-fledge time tracking app.

6. Find & Eliminate Time-Wasting Activities

One of the tenets of time management is to locate and remove those actions which waste time. If you’ve properly tracked your activities throughout a day or week, you’ll have a better picture of what’s a time waster.

If you’re strapped for time but finding you’re taking 30-minute showers, taking an hour to prepare a lunch that you eat in 5 minutes, or going on Wikipedia or Twitter tangents, you can start with these as far as areas for improvement.

7. Categorize Activities Using the ABCD Analysis

If you can categorize your schedule and chores by using the ABCD analysis, from emails needing a reply to preparing for an upcoming exam to even washing the dishes from last night, you’ll be following one of the most important strategies of managing time.

8. Avoid Procrastination

Valerie P. Jackson, M.D. says that, aside from perfectionism, procrastination is the biggest stumbling block when managing time. “When we put off tasks (usually distasteful tasks), we often increase our anxiety level, further delaying our work on the task.”

9. Use a Calendar & Stick to a Routine

Time is a precious resource, and there’s no getting it back once it’s gone. A calendar facilitates time management by allowing you to plan out your day, week, and month ahead, ensuring you give every important task, meeting, or other event the allotment it deserves. On top of that, you’ll be sure not to miss anything important!

10. Remove Distractions

If you’re writing an important paper, silence your phone and mute notifications. If you’re tempted to look at it anyway, hide it in another room until you finish. Is there an annoying noise from construction outside? Turn up your Spotify playlist to drown out the noise.

11. Set Time Limits

If your inbox is flooded with emails, promise yourself you’ll only knock out as many as you can do in one hour, for instance, rather than leaving it open-ended. Have an exam you’re cramming for? Set a study time limit for that, as well, to ensure you have the capacity to manage the other important tasks in your life.

12. Get Organized

As you’re getting dressed for work, you need to dig through the pile of unfolded laundry to find something to wear. You didn’t wash any dishes the night before, and so you just eat a slice of ham or two over the sink. You get to your desk at work, and have to clear a space to set your laptop and phone. Once you boot up your computer, you have to use the search function to locate the documents you’re working on, because various icons fill your desktop screen with no rhyme or reason…

Goodwall

[email protected]

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The easiest way to track time – for freelancers and teams (trusted by 20.000 + companies)

21. Learn how to say “No”. You have to carefully guard your schedule and your time. To do that, you have to learn how to say no to people and activities that don’t resonate with your goals, or your company’s goals.

23. Email can be one of the biggest distractions during working hours. If you have your email client constantly open when you’re behind your computer, it can be a big obstacle to doing real deep work. Emails that persistently flow in can be a huge distraction. In some cases email can be real work, but in many cases it can be one of the biggest time wasters. Learn other email management tips.

25. Make sure your computer and other tech gadgets are also optimized for productivity. Don’t have too many programs, highly organize your folders, and make sure you don’t have any malware. Buy as fast a computer as you can afford.

26. An easy way to make a big improvement in productivity is definitely by having two big monitors. You should maybe even use three, but they can emit too much radiation and this could cause headaches. In any case, you won’t believe how much more productive you can be on a computer with multiple screens compared to a laptop or a tablet.

27. Try to start your day early. As Benjamin Franklin said, “Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.” From 5am to 7 am, when everyone else is asleep, you can do a lot of productive work.

28. Every one of us has a different personal biorhythm. Find out if you are more of a morning or an evening person. Identify your personal biorhythm, then plan naps and walks for the less energetic time of the day, and creative flows or agile execution for that time of the day when you feel the most productive and energetic.

30. Establish healthy routines. A routine is something that you do automatically, without any effort. For example, if you develop a routine of starting your day with the most important task, it will become something that you get used to do and your productivity will skyrocket.

31. Drinking at least 2 – 3 liters of water per day will help you stay fresh, focused, and energized. When your mouth is dry, you are already too late. The best way to follow this advice is to have a bottle of water with you at all times and just drink it throughout the day.

32. Negative people are ultra-uncomfortable distractions in your life. Not only do they waste your time, but they also suck the energy out of you. Stay away from such people. Surround yourself with people who motivate you, encourage you, and help you achieve your goals.

Authorship:

https://www.briantracy.com/blog/time-management/time-management-tips/
https://www.goodwall.io/blog/time-management-tips/
https://www.spica.com/blog/time-management-tips